.\Matthew Long

{An unsorted collection of thoughts}

Scripting Series – Interesting things you can do with VBScript and Powershell Part 4 – Setting up HyperV host networking

Posted by Matthew on October 11, 2011

As you may recall from the introduction to this series, I was tasked with creating a script that would handle the setup/tear down of student lab machines that were to be used for short training courses.  The PCs belong to the training provider and it’s up to the instructor to come in before the course and set all of the student machines up.  Often 15 times, on a sunday.

This post deals with the (relatively simple) task of setting up the virtual network adapter that is normally nearly always provided as an internal/external network on the student machines, specifically the IP settings so that the guest VMs can communicate with the host HyperV server.

Let’s take a look at the script first, and then i’ll walk you through it.  As noted in the first article, I used James O’ Neill’s fantastic HyperV Module to accomplish the HyperV lifting!

The Script


#Setup Internal HyperV Network if it doesn't already exist

If (!(Get-VMSwitch $NetworkName))
{
New-VMInternalSwitch -VirtualSwitchName $NetworkName -Force | Out-Null
}
Else
{
Write-Host "`nVirtual Network '$NetworkName' already exists, Skipping..."
}

#Setup Local Loopback adapter
$vSwitch = Get-WmiObject -Query ('Select * from Win32_PnPEntity where name = "' + $NetworkName +'"')
$Query = "Associators of {$vSwitch} where ResultClass=Win32_NetworkAdapter"
$NicName = (Get-WmiObject -query $Query ).NetConnectionID
Invoke-Expression 'netsh interface ip set address "$NicName" static 192.168.1.150 255.255.255.0'
Write-Host "Server now has IP on internal network of '192.168.1.150'"

The code is fairly self explanatory, but i’ll walk through it anyway.  First we use the HyperV module to determine if there is an Internal network with the given name in $NetworkName already in existence, and if not we create it.  If you haven’t seen it before, Out-Null is a powershell command to send pipeline information into the aether, and is useful when you don’t want a cmdlet writing back objects or text to the console during execution (a lot of people just instead write to a variable they have no intention of using).

This will create a Virtual network card on the host HyperV system, which can be seen in network connections.  The name you set in HyperV for the name of the network will be the PNP device name, as shown below..

We then use that name to associate the PNP device to the network adapter, and then invoke good old netsh to set the adapter for us automatically.

Why use those methods

I realize that the PNP device name is actually a property directly available on the Win32_NetworkAdapter class, so why didn’t I use it?  The short answer is that the NetworkAdapter can have some very odd behaviours sometimes (watch what happens to your MAC address when you disable the network adapter..) and to avoid those issue’s I only used properties of the class I knew I could rely on – namely the NetConnectionId.

I could have also used WMI to set the IP address information, but it’s nowhere near as easy as calling netsh and certainly isn’t accomplished in a single neat line.  There is no harm in doing it using WMI if you so wish (and that will be easier if you were doing complex configuration changes).

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